Book to Market Valuation of 0.085832 For Casa Systems, Inc. (CASA) is Getting Attention

Casa Systems, Inc. (CASA) is yielding a market ratio of 0.085832. The book to market ratio is a relative valuation ratio which divides the  book value of a company by the market value.  The ratio is meant to provide an indication of valuation.  It is commonly believed a book to value ratio above 1 suggests that the company is undervalued while a ratio above 1 suggests that it is overvalued due to the fact that the companies assets are worth less than its market value.

Formula:

Book-to-Market Ratio= Common Shareholders Equity/Market Cap

Most investors are more familiar with P/B or Price-to-book. This is just the inverted value.

Price-to-Book Ratio=Market Cap/Common Shareholders Equity

Investors may be watching the ebb and flow of the current market environment and be wondering what the next few months have in store. They may be deciding whether now is a good time to sell off some first half winners or hold on for further gains. This can be one of the toughest decisions that an investor has to make. Just because a stock has been steadily heading higher for an extended period of time doesn’t necessarily mean that it will continue to do so. Building the confidence to make the tough portfolio decisions may take some time and a few good trades under the belt. New investors may be prone to get discouraged after a few sour trades in a row. Anyone who wants to succeed in the stock market knows that there is no substitute for research and hard work. Being able to bounce back and learn from mistakes may help the investor stay in the game and get back on the road to healthy profits.

NCAV-to-Market

Benjamin Graham, professor and founder of value investing principles, was one of the first to consistently screen the market looking for bargain companies based on value factors. He didn’t have databases such as ValueSignals at his disposal, but used people like his apprentice Warren Buffet to fill out stock sheets with the most important data. Casa Systems, Inc. (CASA) has an NCAV to Market value of 0.031173.

Graham was always on the watch for firms that were so discounted, that if the company went into liquidation, the proceeds of the assets would still return a profit.

Stock market investing can sometimes be a wild ride. High volatility stocks may seem to constantly going haywire. Finding a comfortable balance between stomach turning stocks and low volatility stable stocks may be the way to go. Building confidence in the stock portfolio may come with some trial and error for the individual investor. Many people will rely on others to actively manage their money, but there are always those who prefer to have a hand in every aspect of their hard earned cash. Staying on top of the markets may seem impossible sometimes. There is always something happening, and keeping the pulse on market movements may be quite a struggle. Applying the proper amount of time to dedicate for stock research might just be the difference between buying that next big winner or getting stuck with a big loser.   

Casa Systems, Inc. (CASA) has a current MF Rank of 463. Developed by hedge fund manager Joel Greenblatt, the intention of the formula is to spot high quality companies that are trading at an attractive price. The formula uses ROIC and earnings yield ratios to find quality, undervalued stocks. In general, companies with the lowest combined rank may be the higher quality picks.

VC3

Value Composite Three (VC3) is another adaptation of O’Shaughnessy’s value composite but here he combines the factors used in VC1 with buyback yield. This factor is interesting for investors who’re looking for stocks with the best value characteristics, but are indifferent to whether these companies pay a dividend.

VC3 is the combination of the following factors:

Price-to-Book
Price-to-Earnings
Price-to-Sales
EBITDA/EV
Price-to-Cash flow
Buyback Yield

As with the VC1 and VC2, companies are put into groups from 1 to 100 for each ratio and the individual scores are summed up. This total score is then put into groups again from 1 to 100. 1 is cheap, 100 is expensive.

The scorecard also displays variants of the VC3 where the score is calculated for the selected company compared to peer companies in the same industry, industry group or sector.

Please note that we use Book-to-Market instead of P/B since it allows a more accurate sorting compared to P/B. Stocks with a high B/M show up at the top of the list, stocks with negative B/M are at the bottom of the list. For the same reason we use Earnings-to-Price instead of Price-to-Earnings and Cash flow-to-price instead instead of Price-to-cash flow.

Also important is that we always make sure that companies with the same score get added to the same percentile. For stock universes where the number of stocks is less than 100, we make sure that the stocks are still allocated to percentiles from 0 to 100 instead of 0 to the total number of stocks. This is particularly relevant for the industry, industry group or sector variants where if additional filters are used, the number of stocks often drops below 100.

Casa Systems, Inc. (CASA) has a VC3 of 48.

Casa Systems, Inc. (CASA) has a Value Composite score of 29. Developed by James O’Shaughnessy, the VC score uses five valuation ratios. These ratios are price to earnings, price to cash flow, EBITDA to EV, price to book value, and price to sales. The VC is displayed as a number between 1 and 100. In general, a company with a score closer to 0 would be seen as undervalued, and a score closer to 100 would indicate an overvalued company. Adding a sixth ratio, shareholder yield, we can view the Value Composite 2 score which is currently sitting at 47.

Watching some historical volatility numbers on shares of Casa Systems, Inc. (CASA), we can see that the 12 month volatility is presently 66.3631. The 6 month volatility is 64.7698, and the 3 month is spotted at 66.4331. Following volatility data can help measure how much the stock price has fluctuated over the specified time period. Although past volatility action may help project future stock volatility, it may also be vastly different when taking into account other factors that may be driving price action during the measured time period.

Investors may be trying to decide if stocks will make new highs before the year is out, and whether or not the bull market will celebrate its 9th anniversary next year. The tricky part is prognosticating the short term picture. Investors may not be comfortable enough to go all in, but they may not want to get bearish given the solid economic backdrop. Will there be a big breakout given the strength of earnings and economic growth? Will investors just become numb to the headlines and decide to focus on the positive economic picture? It is always wise to remember that the market can have a correction at any time for any reason. If the political landscape gets even more dysfunctional, then it may be enough of a driver to spur a correction.