A Look at Some Alternative Metrics For General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) as ROA Hits 0.091544

There are many different tools to determine whether a company is profitable or not. One of the most popular ratios is the “Return on Assets” (aka ROA). This score indicates how profitable a company is relative to its total assets. The Return on Assets for General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) is 0.091544. This number is calculated by dividing net income after tax by the company’s total assets. A company that manages their assets well will have a higher return, while a company that manages their assets poorly will have a lower return.

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Taking a step further we can take a look at various other valuation metrics.  General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) has a Price to Book ratio of 3.758949. This ratio is calculated by dividing the current share price by the book value per share. Investors may use Price to Book to display how the market portrays the value of a stock. Checking in on some other ratios, the company has a Price to Cash Flow ratio of 9.362256, and a current Price to Earnings ratio of 12.308038. The P/E ratio is one of the most common ratios used for figuring out whether a company is overvalued or undervalued.

The Free Cash Flor Yield 5yr Average is calculated by taking the five year average free cash flow of a company, and dividing it by the current enterprise value.  Enterprise Value is calculated by taking the market capitalization plus debt, minority interest and preferred shares, minus total cash and cash equivalents.  The average FCF of a company is determined by looking at the cash generated by operations of the company.  The Free Cash Flow Yield 5 Year Average of General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) is 0.047122. 

The Return on Invested Capital (aka ROIC) for General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) is 0.561998.  The Return on Invested Capital is a ratio that determines whether a company is profitable or not.  It tells investors how well a company is turning their capital into profits.  The ROIC is calculated by dividing the net operating profit (or EBIT) by the employed capital.  The employed capital is calculated by subrating current liabilities from total assets.  Similarly, the Return on Invested Capital Quality ratio is a tool in evaluating the quality of a company’s ROIC over the course of five years.  The ROIC Quality of General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) is 6.037621.  This is calculated by dividing the five year average ROIC by the Standard Deviation of the 5 year ROIC.  The ROIC 5 year average is calculated using the five year average EBIT, five year average (net working capital and net fixed assets).  The ROIC 5 year average of General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) is 0.593633.

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General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) presently has a current ratio of 0.58. The current ratio, also known as the working capital ratio, is a liquidity ratio that displays the proportion of current assets of a business relative to the current liabilities. The ratio is simply calculated by dividing current liabilities by current assets. The ratio may be used to provide an idea of the ability of a certain company to pay back its liabilities with assets. Typically, the higher the current ratio the better, as the company may be more capable of paying back its obligations.

In terms of value, General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) has a Value Composite score of 38. Developed by James O’Shaughnessy, the VC score uses five valuation ratios. These ratios are price to earnings, price to cash flow, EBITDA to EV, price to book value, and price to sales. The VC is displayed as a number between 1 and 100. In general, a company with a score closer to 0 would be seen as undervalued, and a score closer to 100 would indicate an overvalued company. Adding a sixth ratio, shareholder yield, we can view the Value Composite 2 score which is currently sitting at 45.

Quant Ranks (ERP5, Gross Margin, F Score)

The ERP5 Rank is an investment tool that analysts use to discover undervalued companies.  The ERP5 looks at the Price to Book ratio, Earnings Yield, ROIC and 5 year average ROIC.  The ERP5 of General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) is 3681.  The lower the ERP5 rank, the more undervalued a company is thought to be.

The Piotroski F-Score is a scoring system between 1-9 that determines a firm’s financial strength.  The score helps determine if a company’s stock is valuable or not.  The Piotroski F-Score of General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) is 5.  A score of nine indicates a high value stock, while a score of one indicates a low value stock.  The score is calculated by the return on assets (ROA), Cash flow return on assets (CFROA), change in return of assets, and quality of earnings.  It is also calculated by a change in gearing or leverage, liquidity, and change in shares in issue.  The score is also determined by change in gross margin and change in asset turnover.

Investors may be interested in viewing the Gross Margin score on shares of General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS). The name currently has a score of 18.00000. This score is derived from the Gross Margin (Marx) stability and growth over the previous eight years. The Gross Margin score lands on a scale from 1 to 100 where a score of 1 would be considered positive, and a score of 100 would be seen as negative.

Price Index

The Price Index is a ratio that indicates the return of a share price over a past period. The price index of General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) for last month was 1.15378. This is calculated by taking the current share price and dividing by the share price one month ago. If the ratio is greater than 1, then that means there has been an increase in price over the month. If the ratio is less than 1, then we can determine that there has been a decrease in price. Similarly, investors look up the share price over 12 month periods. The Price Index 12m for General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) is 0.75064.
Price Range 52 Weeks

Some of the best financial predictions are formed by using a variety of financial tools. The Price Range 52 Weeks is one of the tools that investors use to determine the lowest and highest price at which a stock has traded in the previous 52 weeks. The Price Range of General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) over the past 52 weeks is 0.696000. The 52-week range can be found in the stock’s quote summary.

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